CALICO

From Black power to prison power : the making of Jones v. North Carolina Prisoners' Labor Union / Donald F. Tibbs.

By: Tibbs, Donald F
Material type: TextTextSeries: Contemporary Black history: Publisher: New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2012Copyright date: ©2012Edition: First editionDescription: xviii, 260 pages ; 22 cmContent type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9780230340169; 0230340164Subject(s): N.C. Prisoners' Labor Union -- Trials, litigation, etc | North Carolina. Department of Correction -- Trials, litigation, etc | African American prisoners -- Legal status, laws, etc. -- United States | Freedom of association -- United States | Labor unions -- Law and legislation -- United States | Black power -- North Carolina -- History -- 20th century | Jones v. North Carolina Prisoners' Labor Union, Inc., 433 U. S. 119 (1977)LOC classification: KF228.N2 | T53 2012Summary: "This book uses the landmark case Jones v. North Carolina Prisoners' Labor Union to examine the strategies of prison inmates using race and radicalism to inspire the formation of an inmate labor union. It thus rekindles the debate over the triumphs and troubles associated with the use of Black Power as a platform for influencing legal policy and effecting change for inmates. While the ideology of the prison rights movement was complex, it rested on the underlying principle that the right to organize, and engage in political dissidence, was not only a First Amendment right guaranteed to free blacks, but one that should be explicitly guaranteed to captive blacks--a point too often overlooked in previous analyses. Ultimately, this seminal case study not only illuminates the history of Black Power but that of the broader prisoners' rights movement as well"--Provided by publisher.
Item type Current location Collection Call number Copy number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
TREATISES, 1 VOLUME Newark Campus
Law General Collection
Law General Collection KF228.N2 T53 2012 (Browse shelf) 1 Available 35145003073931
Total holds: 0

Includes bibliographical references and index.

"This book uses the landmark case Jones v. North Carolina Prisoners' Labor Union to examine the strategies of prison inmates using race and radicalism to inspire the formation of an inmate labor union. It thus rekindles the debate over the triumphs and troubles associated with the use of Black Power as a platform for influencing legal policy and effecting change for inmates. While the ideology of the prison rights movement was complex, it rested on the underlying principle that the right to organize, and engage in political dissidence, was not only a First Amendment right guaranteed to free blacks, but one that should be explicitly guaranteed to captive blacks--a point too often overlooked in previous analyses. Ultimately, this seminal case study not only illuminates the history of Black Power but that of the broader prisoners' rights movement as well"--Provided by publisher.

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